Month: November 2019

7 Eco-Friendly DIY Toy Projects You Have to Try

Are you tired of hearing “Mom, I’m bored!” but don’t want to fall into the trap of indulgent parenting and buy a bunch of plastic toys that get thrown out in a few weeks? There is a surprising solution that you might not have thought about before. Making DIY toys at home is a great way to expand your little one’s creativity, and it also has the added benefit of being more environmentally conscious.

Check out these great toy hacks that are easy to make yourself with environmentally friendly materials.

Recycled Cardboard Play Houses

This environmentally friendly option lets you turn all those old Amazon shipping boxes into a fun activity instead of tossing them in the trash. A cardboard playhouse is a great project because your child can have hours of fun building it and then continue to use it for weeks. Place it outside to get some fresh air or keep it indoors to let the house last longer.

To get started, all you need is a collection of cardboard boxes, some sturdy scissors, and tape. Decorating with water based paint can add a fun touch, but remember to use it sparingly because painted cardboard cannot be recycled later on. There are all sorts of neat ideas all over the internet, or you can come up with your own original design. 

Homemade Baby Blocks

Blocks are one of the most classic toy options for any baby or toddler, but they are often pricey and coated in layers of harmful paint and varnish. This project can involve a little woodworking, but it is not always necessary. For those new to DIY and carpentry, making these baby blocks can be as easy as getting precut wood cubes, sanding them down, and applying a finish. However, if you or your partner is interested in things like wood carving, you can customize with carved letters or other cute designs on the side!

The key to making these blocks baby safe and eco-friendly is all about the materials you select. Pick high quality wood that has not been pressure treated or otherwise soaked in chemicals. Use a food safe, penetrating oil like tung oil or linseed oil to provide a protective coat along the outside of the block. After letting the oil soak in and cure, you get adorable, glossy wooden blocks to build towers with your little one!

Repurposed Play Kitchen

Avoid buying unsustainable plastic toy kitchens by upcycling an old piece of furniture instead. You don’t have to be an experienced woodworker, all you need is a little paint and a few screwdrivers! This incredible idea comes from GiggleBerry Creations, and it shows just how much difference a few simple changes can be. Start out with an old TV unit that is just the right height for your little chef, and give it a fresh coat of paint.

With a few additions like a cheap sink faucet, painted on stovetop, and new doors, it transforms into a cute little stovetop, sink, oven, and fridge. You can get all the knobs, faucets, and handles needed to transform the kitchen from broken appliances if you want to be extra eco-friendly. Once you finish this DIY project, your child can pretend to bake, cook, and clean just like mom or dad! 

Snuggly Teddy Bears 

Skip polyester bears filled with ocean-damaging microbeads and make a stuffed animal yourself. Whether you’re a seasoned knitter or just looking for a new craft to pick up, a knitted bear can be an adorable toy for a child who wants something snuggly. This project is easy to customize with different materials, colors, and knitting patterns. 

Wool yarn is an environmentally sustainable material that is gathered without harming the animals, and it has the added benefit of being resistant to spills! For a green filling, consider using buckwheat hulls, kapok tree fiber, or unspun wool. Feel free to use this easy (and free!) pattern from Ravelry, or pick out your own to find one that suits your needs.

Paper Towel Marble Runs

All this neat DIY toy needs is some paper towel or toilet paper tubes. Once you cut them in half and tape them into a fun shape, they turn into a cool track to slide marbles and other materials along. As this fun video from Brick Building Kids shows, there are plenty of neat configurations for a marble run.

In addition to being a great way to recycle cardboard, it can also be a great learning activity! You can generate an early interest in physics and engineering throughout this entire project. We know it might seem like this toy is only going to keep your child occupied while they are building it, but you’d be surprised by how long it continues to entertain. With some toy cars, bouncy balls, or other materials, the marble run can turn into a busy racetrack that provides excitement for hours.

DIY Drum Kits

This is the perfect eco-friendly toy if you just finished painting the house and don’t mind having a bit of noise! To make the drums, you start by simply collecting wood, plastic, or metal gardening and paint buckets of different sizes. Then you and your child can clean them, let them dry, and decorate them with glitter and glue. If desired, you can even hang a few of the lids on a rope or stand to turn them into gongs and cymbals.

Arrange the drums on a flat surface, find a pair of sturdy sticks, and get ready to rock. Of course we know there are plenty of moms who might cringe at the idea of giving their kid anything noisy, but if you have a basement or big yard, this can be a fun project that helps get your child in touch with their musical side. 

Fabric Baby Books 

Say goodbye to torn covers and creased pages when you create a cute fabric book for your baby to play with. You can choose your material based on your preferred style of environmental consciousness. If your focus is using sustainable materials without chemicals or toxins, consider natural fabrics like unbleached linen or bamboo dyed with vegetable dyes. Moms who love reusing and recycling can cut up old shirts or sheets to make the baby books, which can also be a cute way to incorporate fabric from sentimental clothing. 

To make the baby book, start by choosing your design. This can be as simple as shapes and letters, or you can get fabric printed with cute pictures to cut out. Then you just need to cut your pieces to the right size and sew or glue them together. Check out this helpful guide from MySewBliss to get an idea of how to assemble the book as easily as possible.

These fun toy ideas can keep your kids entertained for hours, so you can get some much needed “Me Time.” Since they are eco-friendly, you don’t have to worry about exposing your loved ones to a bunch of chemicals or having the toys pile up in landfills later on. If you’ve tried any of these neat DIY ideas before, let us know how it went!

Author’s bio:

My name is Ivana Davies and I’m an educator turned stay-at-home mom to a beautiful 7 year old girl and a playful 5 year old boy. Since I didn’t have a clue about raising kids, I had to learn it all in a hard way. I managed to find so much information online, and that inspired me to turn to blogging to share my experiences and struggles as a mom. Being a mom is not easy. In fact, in can sometimes be pretty isolating. My blog, Find Your Mom Tribe, is here to help you connect with other moms, as well as to share mom hacks, information, and tools to help you on this parenting journey. You can catch up with us on Facebook and Pinterest.

Note from Little Family

I want to take a moment to thank Ivana at Find Your Mom Tribe, for crafting this post. It’s chalk full of awesome activities for the Little’s in your life, so hopefully you find these ideas helpful! If you have some time I highly suggest you venture over to her site Find Your Mom Tribe. She has excellent posts on parenting, pregnancy and even recipes!

Adventure to Yoho National Park

Adventure to YoHo National Park

This year is for our family vacation we took an adventure to Yoho National Park. Yoho National Park is in British Columbia settled in the midst of the beautiful Canadian Rockies. Yoho is situated next to its more well known sister park Banff. North of Yoho is also Jasper National Park.

We often get asked why Yoho when we tell people about our travels. We first learned about Yoho through a spread in National Geographic magazine and fell in love the with speculator views. The more we learned about Yoho the more we wanted to go.

So stayed tune for details on our adventure to Yoho National Park.

If you are wanting to plan your own Yoho National Park adventure, I suggest you check out the parks web page here.

Disclaimer: This blog post contains affiliated links. As an Amazon associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you use them, I might be rewarded credit or a commission of the sale. Please note that I only recommend what I personally use and love and I always have my readers best interest at heart 

Our Travels

For the first part of our journey, we flew into the Calgary, Alberta airport. That night we checked out Calgary a little, but spent most of our evening in our hotel room. We both weren’t feeling very well and Little One needed some play time. The next morning was a different story…our first stop was Nose Hill!

Nose Hill, Calgary

Nose Hill is an amazing park in Calgary. It is a grassy, hilly area with many wandering trails and beautiful views. We loved spending time here, and wished we had all day to explore, but we had more to see. We went to lunch and then headed to the grocery store. After that we hit the road for Yoho National Park! It was a couple hours drive from Calgary and absolutely beautiful! I loved watching the mountains grow on the horizon.

Lake Louise, Banff National Park

On our way to Yoho we stopped at Lake Louise in Banff National Park. There is a lot to do and see in this area and I wish we had more time there. After turning off Highway 1, there is a visitor center and a a row of gift shops and eateries to enjoy. We are not into the souvenirs so much but we did get a book about the Rocky Mountains. We followed the road up the mountain to Lake Louise. I can imagine that this area is extremely busy in the summer, but they have ample parking lots and they also have a bus system that can transport people to the lake.

When we were there it was snowy and we couldn’t see the tops of the mountains, but it was still gorgeous. There were lots a people out and about but the traffic would thin out quite a bit once starting on the trails. We were planning on walking on the trails but Little One went from a nice nap in the car to a cold stroller in the snow. Needless to say he was not into it!

The Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise is absolutely beautiful and is right on the edge of Lake Louise. I would love to stay there but it was out of our budget. Maybe someday.

After our excursion at Lake Louise we headed to Field in Yoho National Park!

Snowy day at Lake Louise
Snowy day at Lake Louise
Snowy day at Lake Louise
Fairmont Chateau Lake Louise

Field, Yoho National Park

We stayed in Field in a cute rental, the Mount Van Horne Guest House. Field is a small town with a population of 200 people. Many of the homes have rental units for visitors. There is one restaurant, lodge, cafe and pottery studio for us to explore. Right as you enter town there is a gas station to the left and the visitor center to the right. We stopped at the visitor center multiple times to check in on trails and places to see, and the people there were a big help. We also purchased some bear spray…never had to use it but better safe than sorry!

Field, BC
Kicking Horse River

Takakkaw Falls

On the first day of our exploration of Yoho National Park we headed to Takakkaw Falls. Takakkaw Falls is a short drive east of Field down Yoho Valley Road. The drive there was absolutely beautiful and we stopped multiple times on the side of the road to take in views and some pictures. There is one switch back on the road and large vehicles, like campers, are not advised. We had a mid sized car and made it just fine. The morning we went out it had snowed overnight so all the evergreens were dusted with snow. It gave a magical quality to the forest.

Takakkaw Falls has a large parking lot, but I would imagine during peak season (June, July, August) that it would be very full, so it’s best to go early or later if you’re there during those months. For us in late September there were many open parking spots. Much of the trail is paved so it is easily accessible by strollers and wheel chairs. It is a fairly short hike, taking between 10-20 minutes. It took us much longer due to stopping for photos and standing in awe of the beauty around us.

Takakkaw Falls descends 830 feet down a cliff to the river. There are plenty of opportunities for rock hopping and exploring. For those adventurous souls there are many trail heads that can be accessed from the parking lot.

Natural Bridge

Natural Bridge

Natural Bridge can be found on Emerald Lake Road, not too far off the highway. I wish we were able to explore more but it was nearing the end of the day. There is something about a river that I just need to see what is around the next bend! It was so beautiful.

Natural Bridge is a formation of rocks over the river, and the river falls under the rocks creating a bridge. There is a man made bridge over the river that offers great views of the falls.

Emerald Lake

Emerald Lake has to be one of my favorite stops on our trip. To get to Emerald Lake, continue up Emerald Lake Road. At the end of it there is a parking lot. I suggest going either early or later, since it does get rather busy. Quick note – there is a trail head at the top of the parking that goes to Hamilton Falls, which I recommend doing. At the other end of the parking lot are outhouses and the information center. There is also a small gift shop that has canoe rentals. To the right you can cross a bridge to Emerald Lake Lodge. This area is pretty busy with everyone coming and going so head down the trail opposite the bridge amazing views and less crowds.

There is a 9.2 km trail around Emerald Lake. The first part of the trail is paved and easily accessible for everyone. This portion of the trail will take you to the avalanche path. Continue and there there is a wide gravel path that leads through the trees along the lake shore to about the halfway point of the lake. After crossing a foot bring the tail turns into a rugged foot path. Personally this part of the trail was my favorite. It has more ups and downs and you really earn your progress.. I had Little One in the back pack carrier and he fell asleep, so it wasn’t terribly rough.

Enjoying the view at Emerald Lake
Trail at Emerald Lake
Canoeing on Emerald Lake
Enjoying the view at Emerald Lake
Enjoying the view at Emerald Lake

Our Adventure to Yoho

Unfortunately our last day in Field arrived and we said goodbye to our rental that had treated us so well. We headed back to Calgary but stopped at Lake Louise again, hoping that the snow cleared up a bit…it didn’t. But it was beautiful to see again!

We stayed one more night in Calgary and flew home the next day. Yoho National Park was an amazing adventure for our family and I can’t wait to go back some day!

We had so much fun in Yoho and definitely want to go back soon! This trip was also a learning experience for us, traveling with a toddler. Check out my posts here on 6 tips on preparing travel with a baby and my 20 tips for frying with a toddler.

Have you been ever been to Yoho? Let me know of your adventure to Yoho National Park in the comments below!

Christmas Gift Bags

We are all about reducing waste whenever possible here at Little Family on the Big Lake. With the holiday season fast approaching, I have been thinking about Christmas morning. This year, Little One will be 18 months old, and we are so excited to be experiencing Christmas with him. I wonder what he is going to think of what Santa brought him and all the fun we will have…then I turn to the cleanup. Sure, watching Little One rip off wrapping paper may be fun, but I can’t help thinking about all the waste the wrapping paper has created. So this year, gone is the wrapping paper that only lasts a day. Introducing Christmas gift bags!

On average Americans go through 4 million pounds of wrapping paper each year. To put that into prospective, that is 5,787 football fields! Obviously, this is waste that can be greatly reduced. Gifts can easily be wrapped in alternative materials that could be recycled instead of wrapping paper that sits in a landfill. I have seen brown paper bags and newspaper be cute wrap ping options. But after a trip to Joann’s and seeing all the cute Christmas fabric I decided to go with Christmas bags. Brown paper bags or newspaper is still a good option for those larger packages, though.

There are of course some cloth fabrics bags available on line, you can find them here. However they are really easy to make!

Materials Needed

I got 100% cotton fabric from Joann’s’ and 100% recycled cotton yarn to be used as the draw string. These bags can be reused over and over again. We got a couple of prints that matched well and creates a cohesive look under the tree.

From one yard of fabric I got 8 bags that are around 15” * 10”. I did change sizes to bigger and smaller for different sized gifts.

Process

Step One

The first step in this process is to cut the bags to size. You will need two even pieces of fabric cut to your size of choice to make each bag. A fold in the fabric can be utilized as one of the sides, too. That way you would only need one piece of fabric.

Cutting Christmas bag fabric
Step Two

Next, finish the edges of the fabric to prevent unraveling. I choose to do this by using a serger, but a zig zag stich along the edge or a French seam could be utilized.

Finishing seams
Step Three

If using two pieces of fabric, stitch the two pieces of fabric together using right sides together along the long edge. If you are using one piece of fabric, start with this next step. Along the top edge fold the fabric down between ½” to 1 inch and press it with an iron. This will form a case for the yarn to go in to form the draw string. Stitch down the folded piece, back stitching at the start and end of the fabric.

Creating casing
Sewing casing
Step Four

Then line up the two pieces of fabric right sides together. Stitch along the edges of the fabric, avoiding the top of the bag and the casing that was created so the casing isn’t stitched closed. Be sure to back stitch at the beginning and the end.

Christmas bag
Step Five

Next using a safety pin, tie the end of a piece of yarn. Cut the yarn a couple inches longer then the bag opening. Thread the safety pin through the case opening and push it through until the other end takes the yarn with it. Line the end of the yarn up and tie it off around 1 inch from the end. I like to fray the ends up to the knot.

Inserting draw string
Finished cloth Christmas bag

Repeat the steps for all other bags that you would like to make. These bags are a simple design and there fore can be made relatively quickly. If you can spare 10 minutes this is a great project!

I hope you liked this Christmas gift bag! I loved matching the fabrics and creating a cohesive look for under my Christmas tree. For close family I plan on using the Christmas gift bags, because I can probably get them back. For those other gifts, like the secret Santa at work, I plan on utilizing brown paper!

Have you thought about implementing Christmas gift bags too? Let me know in the comments below.

Check out my other zero waste swap here!

Traveling with Cloth Diapers

Cloth diapering

We have been cloth diapering for 16 months and have gone on several trips during that time. Through trial and error, we have learned a lot. Our trips have been getting easier by following these tips. We have done multiple trips where we traveled for an extended weekend. However, we recently went on a 9-day trip where we flew to Canada. Traveling with cloth diapers was definitely a learning experience!

Disclaimer: This blog post contains affiliated links. As an Amazon associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you use them, I might be rewarded credit or a commission of the sale. Please note that I only recommend what I personally use and love and I always have my readers best interest at heart

Discuss it

Discuss it and be committed to what that means. My husband and I had many conversations before we went on this trip on what we were going to do for diapering. Should we do disposables because it is easier? But what about our commitment to making eco-friendly choices whenever we can? In the end, choosing to travel with cloth diapers was a commitment on both our parts. If we weren’t on the same page it would have been way harder.

Laundry

Plan where you will do laundry. We do not have enough cloth diapers to last a whole week without washing. Going with that many would have also been problematic because we wouldn’t have had enough luggage space. The hotel we stayed at had coin-operated laundry and this is where we planned to do the washing. We also knew that in Field (our ultimate destination) there was a hotel that might let us use the machines.

Learn how to hand wash. When you don’t have access to a machine, try hand washing. I have seen blog posts out there from people who only hand wash their diapers. I was not up for hand washing all the diapers on vacation. However, it was useful for a couple emergency situations. I have seen portable washing machines like this one, that would be great for trips where you are not flying. I foresee portable washing machines being really handy on camping trips.

We air dry our diapers to preserve the elastic. By snapping the diapers together on the ends we created long rows of diapers. We then hung them over hangers in our hotel room. They were dry in no time!

Traveling and Packing

Travel with as many clean diapers as possible. The more diapers you have, the longer you can go without needing to wash them. When on vacation I personally want to do as little amount of laundry as possible. My goal was to try to make it the whole week with only needing to wash them twice.

Pack them unassembled and in once place. When a cloth diaper is assembled it takes up much more space then when all the pieces are separated. By separating the covers from the inserts, I was able to fit way more into the luggage. Also, try to keep all the diapers together in one bag. This prevents anything from going missing or having that surprise moment when you have a dirty diaper and didn’t realize you were out of clean ones.

Put the diapers in the carry on. It would be a nightmare to have all my cloth diapers be lost by the airline. For that reason, I travel with all my cloth diapers in the carry on. If I lose other clothing items, those are easy to replace. All my diapers were ordered online and would be difficult to replace on vacation.

Bring more wet bags than you think you’ll need. We brought 2 large wet bags and 3 of the small ones. The reason for this is once we started on our day adventures, we didn’t want to bring huge wet bags with us. This allowed for moving the diapers around, so we always had a small bag to bring places.

Be Flexible

Be flexible. We had this grand plan for cloth diapering the whole week when we were gone. But then we both ended up feeling unwell. Being sick on vacation, we had barely enough energy to keep up with our little one, let alone to do laundry. We did purchase a very small pack of disposable diapers and used those for a day or two. Once we were feeling better, though, we went back to cloth. You never know what’s going to happen – maybe you get sick, maybe the luggage was stolen, maybe the washer broke. If you do end up using disposables, that’s OK. The point is that you tried, and for every cloth one you use you are preventing a disposable one from going in the trash. 

Do you have any trips planned? Are you thinking about trying cloth diapering? Hopefully these tips on traveling with cloth diapers can help. Let me know how it goes in the comments below!

Next, check out my some of my tips on clothing diapering here.

Zero Waste Travel Kit

Zero Waste Travel Kit

Have you ever been in this situation? You’re at a restaurant and didn’t finish your food, so you ask the waiter for a to-go container…and they bring you a Styrofoam monstrosity (insert big sigh here). I just know that this Styrofoam container is going to be sitting in a landfill for the next couple hundred years. I have been saying for a long time that I needed to stop contributing to this. Now I can’t change what restaurants give out, but I can change if I choose to accept it. No more…instead I am going to bring my zero waste travel kit! 

I made this kit from things I already have in my home. I keep it in my car for whenever it is needed. With using this new kit I also had to implement a process at home. I didn’t want to make a kit, use it once, and then never get it back to the car. We have all been in this situation with other things.

The new system is as follows. Once the items are washed they are placed next to our key bowl. On the next trip to the car it is taken with the keys. It’s pretty simple, but it is important to spell out the expectations. 

Below are the items that I have included in the zero waste travel kit. While I encourage you to use items that you have around your home, I will link similar items, too. 

Disclaimer: This blog post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you use them, I might be rewarded credit or a commission of the sale. Please note that I only recommend what I personally use and love and I always have my readers best interest at heart 

Identifying Situations

So when building this kit, the first thing I looked at was the types of situations that I find myself in. I didn’t want to put something in my kit that I would never use. 

Most of the time I have need of the kit at restaurants when we have left over food. However, I would like to do an experiment to see if fast food places would put the food in my container instead of in their wrappers. I’ll let you know how it goes! 

I also find myself needing some of my zero waste products when I am shopping, so those items have gone into the kit, as well. I normally bring shopping bags with me when going to the grocery store, but when I don’t have a bag, it is nice to have a back up. 

If you set out to make your own zero waste kit. I encourage you to look at the situations that you encounter when you wish you had a zero waste alternative.

Items in the Zero Waste Kit

Large Container 

Beeswax Wraps 

Water bottle /mason jar 

Produce bag 

Straw 

Silverware

Grocery Bag 

Zero Waste Travel Kit

Travel Kit

Everything for this kit is contained in a large plastic container that I already owned. While I don’t love using plastic, I would rather be putting it to good use instead of throwing it in the recycling. This container is great for taking those leftovers home in instead of using Styrofoam or cardboard takeout containers. 

I have also included beeswax wraps for any other leftovers that need to be wrapped up or for shopping. I can foresee it being useful for bulk bin purchases. 

The water bottle or mason jar is also an essential for my zero waste travel kit. Most of the time I bring a water bottle with me but sometimes I forget. I also included a mason jar as a good alternative because it could be used for both drinking or food storage. Double duty! 

I included a straw because restaurants tend to bring you one. I like to bring my own and use one of the 5 R’s and refuse the disposable plastic type. Having an extra straw is also handy for my son, since he’s only one year old and drinks better out of glasses with a straw. Also, waiters sometimes bring us a plastic sippy cup, but I would prefer a regular glass and give him one of the reusable straws to use. 

With this kit I included some silverware. These ones are just plastic ones that I picked up some where. Instead of buying new ones, try reusing some old ones. I did link some bamboo ones that are made of a more sustainable material.

The produce bag and grocery bag are for when I find myself needing them while shopping. I got this grocery bag from a conference that I went to. I made the produce bags and you can, too…check out my post on how to make a product bag here.

Have you tried making a zero waste travel it? Let me know how it went!

Beeswax Wraps

Plastic wrap is one of the easiest things to eliminate from your home on the journey to zero waste. When you really think about it, there are alternatives to everything that plastic wrap can be used for. One of the more obvious is just using containers instead. But for those items that need to be wrapped, try beeswax wraps.

There are so many beeswax wraps on the market, like these. They are a great choice, but did you know that you can make your own? I know, pretty cool! Instead of purchasing a pack of 3 for $18.00, you can make your own for a fraction of the cost. Also, you can use left over fabric that you already have…truly zero waste!

***Disclaimer: This blog post contains affiliated links. As an Amazon associate I earn from qualifying purchases. If you use them, I might be rewarded credit or a commission of the sale. Please note that I only recommend what I personally use and love and I always have my readers best interest at heart.

Materials Needed

Fabric – It’s best to use 100% cotton and a looser weave. Also, it works better with fabrics that are dyed instead of printed. I personally like gingham fabric.

Beeswax Pellets

Grape Seed Oil

Jelly Roll Pan

Oven

Pinking Shears

Parchment Paper

** I linked the supplies needed, but if you already have the supplies needed, use those instead of buying new.

Beeswax and grape seed oil

Process

First, press the fabric with an iron and cut it to size using the pinking shears. I normally use 12 inch by 12 inch squares but the beauty of this is that you can custom make any size you need.

Pre-heat the oven to 175* F.

Lay the fabric down on the jelly roll pan over a piece of parchment paper. It’s best if the fabric is completely flat. However, if the fabric is bigger then the jelly roll pan, then just fold the fabric over on itself.

Place 1-2 tablespoons (depending on the size of the fabric) of beeswax pellets on top of the fabric, spreading them evenly. Next, add 1/2 teaspoon of grape seed over the fabric.

Place the pan in the oven for 5-7 minutes or until all the beeswax is melted. Once done, take it out of the oven and check that the fabric is covered. A basting brush can be used to move the melted beeswax around. More beeswax can be added at this point if needed, and then pop it back into the oven. Once this is done, take the fabric off the jelly roll pan and gently wave it through the air until it’s dried This should only take a minute or two.

Repeat as needed.

beeswax wrap before heating
beeswax wrap after heating in oven

Care and Maintenance

Beeswax wraps can be used in place of what you use plastic wrap for. However, you shouldn’t use it for raw meat.

Beeswax wraps can be hand washed with soap and water, then laid to dry. The wraps are good for 6-12 months. When they are showing some signs of wear and tear, they can be placed in the oven again with more wax. If it gets to the point where they cannot be used anymore, they can be placed in the compost bin (I strongly recommend cutting the fabric into small pieces first.)

Notes

The beeswax is not easy to get off the jelly roll plan, so use an older pan or one designated just for this project.

I have tried the ironing method to making the wraps. Place the fabric with beeswax on a piece of parchment paper and fold the paper over the top. Next, iron until the wax is melted. This worked well to make the wraps but I did get beeswax all over my ironing board.

Beeswax wraps are a great zero waste switch. Have you tried them? Let me know your thoughts down below!

Next, check out my zero waste switch to produce bags.